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Cortlandt May Seek To Tear Down 'Dangerous' Buildings

Town of Cortlandt officials could seek to deem this property "dangerous," which eventually could give them the option of condemning it.
Town of Cortlandt officials could seek to deem this property "dangerous," which eventually could give them the option of condemning it. Photo Credit: Jessica Glenza
Town of Cortlandt officials could seek to deem this property "dangerous," which eventually could give them the option of condemning it.
Town of Cortlandt officials could seek to deem this property "dangerous," which eventually could give them the option of condemning it. Photo Credit: Jessica Glenza
Town of Cortlandt officials could seek to deem this property "dangerous," which eventually could give them the option of condemning it.
Town of Cortlandt officials could seek to deem this property "dangerous," which eventually could give them the option of condemning it. Photo Credit: Jessica Glenza
Town of Cortlandt officials could seek to deem this property "dangerous," which eventually could give them the option of condemning it.
Town of Cortlandt officials could seek to deem this property "dangerous," which eventually could give them the option of condemning it. Photo Credit: Jessica Glenza
Town of Cortlandt officials could seek to deem this property "dangerous," which eventually could give them the option of condemning it.
Town of Cortlandt officials could seek to deem this property "dangerous," which eventually could give them the option of condemning it. Photo Credit: Jessica Glenza

CORTLANDT, N.Y. - Cortlandt town officials may attempt to have two privately owned properties deemed "dangerous" and have them repaired or torn down at the owners' expense.

The properties are owned by two different individuals. One of the properties is a stand-alone home at 270 Furnace Dock Road. The second is a former service station at the corner of Travis Avenue and Route 9A, at 2134 Albany Post Road. What the two properties have in common are broken windows, boarded up entrances and what appears to be easy access to the buildings.

"Even though Tom [Wood, town attorney] has been writing them legal letters, asking, 'what are your plans?' nothing is happening," said Cortlandt Town Supervisor Linda Puglisi.

The listed owner of the single-family home is Anthony Carbone. Government records show the service station is owned by a "company that basically is defunct," Barrier Oil, Puglisi said. The company's contact information is listed as a post office box in Tarrytown.

Whatever the town decides, the process will take time. "If you deem a building dangerous, you don't just go tear it down overnight," Puglisi said.

According to Wood, Town Engineer Ed Vergano and Code Enforcement Manager Ken Hoch, would need to write a report on the buildings and present it to the town board.

If Vergano and Hoch find the structures are dangerous, and the Cortlandt Town Board agrees, then a public hearing must be conducted  After the public hearing, the town board can require improvements be made to the structures and, after a period of time, if the owners do not respond, the town can condemn the buildings. If the buildings are torn down, the expense would be reassessed back onto the owners' taxes.

"It's a long process," Puglisi said.