Galef Supports Assembly Bill to Slow Down Common Core

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Ossining Assemblywoman Sandy Galef is supporting the passing of a bill that would delay the roll out of Common Core standards.
Ossining Assemblywoman Sandy Galef is supporting the passing of a bill that would delay the roll out of Common Core standards. Photo Credit: File Photo

WESTCHESTER COUNTY, N.Y. --  New York State Assemblywoman Sandy Galef announced that she is supporting the passing of a bill that would delay the roll out of Common Core standards. 

Assembly Bill A.8929 would prevent certain test scores from becoming part of students' permanent records and delay the use of test scores as a factor in teacher and principal evaluations for two years. The legislation would also delay the sharing of personally identifiable student data with third-party vendors, according to a release. 

Galef, of Ossining, said that the measure was the best approach to issues with the Common Core because it would not jeopardize the $1 billion in annual funding and $2.1 billion in total federal funding. 

"Many of the students, parents and teachers who have communicated with me agree that the Common Core rollout has caused unbelievable frustration and unneeded stress and anxiety," Galef said. "This would let us put the brakes on, take a breath, and fix that implementation."

The Assembly's legislation prohibits school districts from using test scores from third to eighth grade as the sole or primary factor in determining student promotion or placement decisions. Additionally, those exam results would be barred from being included on a student's official transcript or permanent record, according to the release.

"This legislation is a direct response to concerns that have been raised," Galef said. "Too much testing can have and has had a negative impact on many students and teachers. We need to put the joy back in learning and teaching by cutting back on high-stakes tests which do more harm than good."

In addition to delaying using test scores as a factor in evaluations, the Assembly's legislation also requires the state Education Department to develop tools, resources and materials to be used in optional training programs for teachers and principals so they can adjust to the Common Core, according to the release. 

"It really does seem unfair to expect teachers to meet the new higher demands of the Common Core standards without being given adequate time to prepare, or to fill in learning gaps for the students," Galef said. "The two year delay will help teachers to get the Common Core training they need to make sure our children get the excellent education they deserve. The good news is that while oftentimes 'legislative fixes' can end up costing taxpayers billions of dollars and trigger immediate requirements on schools and student, this fix does not do that at all."

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